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What is Restylane® Silk

What is Restylane® Silk for the lips and when will it be available?

Restylane® Silk is a product that has been on the market in Canada and other countries for years and marketed under the name Restylane Fine Lines. It began FDA trials in the U.S. awhile back and was given the green light last week. This product is a hyaluronic acid-based filler that contains 0.3% Lidocaine (like other Restylane and Perlane products) and is used for lip augmentation and filling fine line lips around the mouth. 

 

As a side note, Valeant (the company that received approval) did just sell Restylane and their filler products to a company named Galderma. That sale goes through at the end of this month, so the product may be on a bit of a delay, as the new company decides how to structure its sales to physicians. 

 

The product is not available to purchase at this time, as Galderma will need to launch their marketing plan first. When the product is available, Dr. Rueckl will take a look at it to see if it should be added into his filler line-up. No prices are available at this time. We will keep you posted as product and pricing details emerge!

What is Resveratrol and how does it work?

Resveratrol is an antioxidant that most famous for being in red wine. However, it can also be applied topically in skincare products and aids in treatment of skin aging. The most important thing about Resveratrol in terms of skincare products is that the ingredient must be stabilized properly. If not, it simply doesn't work, or worse, could actually harm the skin. Many "cheaper" versions of skincare products, or products people try to make at home, simply don't have proper stabilization of ingredients. This means, the product may work once or twice, but as the bottle is being used, the efficacy is going down dramatically. That's why expensive products are expensive - there are reasons to stabilize ingredients - efficacy and safety!

A new product on the market is Resveratrol B E by SkinCeuticals. This topical antioxidant is to be used at night. Why?? Because Resveratrol cannot be exposed to sunlight. So if your bottle is clear or allows light it, any Resveratrol is being compromised. The SkinCeuticals bottle doesn't allow light or air into the packaging, protecting your skin and your investment. Additionally, if you put it on in the daytime, you are actually not getting any efficacy because the ingredient dissipates in sunlight. And one big additional thing - topical Resveratrol can actually increase photosensitivity. So if you put it on in the daytime or your daytime cream contains it, you could be getting MORE aging rays directed at you, not less!

We recommend Resveratrol B E by SkinCeuticals. So far our patients love it.

Legacy by Venus Concept

Lakes Dermatology, Las Vegas, Nevada Announces the Installation of Legacy by Venus Concept, a -0- Downtime Procedure to Lift and Sculpt the Face, Neck and Body

armsusinglegacy

Radio frequency and magnetic pulse therapy has been used effectively in the treatment of fine lines, wrinkles, cellulite and pockets of fat on the body. Lakes Dermatology is the first to introduce Legacy in Las Vegas.

What more could a physician want in an anti-aging procedure? No downtime, no pain, no discomfort and terrific results," said Rueckl.

(PRWEB) January 29, 2014

"No matter your body shape, skin tone, diet or exercise plan, over time everyone's skin loses elasticity, collagen weakens and it becomes harder to lose certain pockets of fat. People develop wrinkles, fine lines and have a genetic predisposition to cellulite which becomes a common concern for both men and women," stated Dr. F. Victor Rueckl today. He continued, "We looked for a piece of equipment that would be comfortable and affordable for our patients. We wanted superior results with no downtime and we have found that equipment. It's called Legacy and is manufactured by the same people that brought us Venus Freeze which has been incredible for our clients too."

What is Legacy?

According to the Venus Concept website, Venus Legacy features LiftFX™ and SculptFX™ are non-invasive and pain free solutions that utilize radio frequency, magnetic pulse therapy and VariPulse™ technology to treat all the patient's concerns in one program. The treatments deliver the frequencies to the skin and produce a dense and uniform heat matrix which causes collagen synthesis, contraction, fibroblast proliferation, neo-vascularity and lipolysis. In other words, tightening. The company states that it's equipment treats:

  • Non-surgical Body Contouring
  • Cellulite Reduction
  • Wrinkle Reduction
  • Circumferential Reduction
  • Skin Tightening

How Many Treatments Will A Patient Need

The number of treatments will completely depend on the patient and their personal desires. The photos that we have included in this article show a variety of time periods.

Are The Treatments Safe?

Radio frequency and magnetic pulse therapy have been used in medicine for many years and are proven safe and effective technologies. Dr. Rueckl will review your medical history and your aesthetic goals to see if the LiftFX™ and SculptFX™ treatments are right for his patients.

Is There Any Downtime?

There is absolutely no downtime. A treatment to one area takes less than 30 minutes and has no adverse side effects. A patient is able to have a treatment during their lunch break and return to work right away.

"I am personally recommending these procedures to all my patients as the results are nothing short of incredible. What more could a physician want in an anti-aging procedure? No downtime, no pain, no discomfort and terrific results," said Rueckl.

For more information about Legacy, pricing and appointments contact Lakes Dermatology at 702-869-6667 or check their website at: http://www.lakesdermatology.com.

Resources:

1). Dr. F.Victor Rueckl, Lakes Dermatology interview 1/21/14

2). http://venusconcept.com/products/venus-legacy/

Black and Gray Market Injectables

Botox, hyaluronic acid, fillers from overseas, and more - black and gray market injectables

I'm often asked by patients how they can see specials for injectors offering Botox for $3/unit or a syringe of Restylane for $200. The answer is black and gray market injectables. Black market injectables would be those that are compounded by illegal pharmacies or companies that are selling illegal copies of fillers or Botox. It happens a lot. We get emails and faxes all the time from companies who offer amazing deals on injectables. But they aren't legitimate and they are fraud. Gray market injectables are those that are legitimate versions of Botox or fillers but they've been imported to this country from Canada, Mexico, etc. This is illegal for an injector to do because we are required to buy from U.S. sources per the FDA. So, bottom line, if you see a deal that's too good to be true - it probably is. And it may be gray or black market injectables. If you love your face, it's worth it to pay for the real thing from an ethical physician.

Juvederm Voluma XC!

Coming Soon - Allergan Juvederm Voluma XC Gets FDA Approval

Allergan received FDA approval yesterday for the dermal filler Juvederm Voluma XC. The new hyaluronic acid filler (with lidocaine) is the only filler approved for midface age-related volumizing. The filler will be available soon and pricing will be determined after specific trainings are set with Allergan. We would assume it will be available the end of 2013 or very early 2014. We will keep you posted. Congratulations to Allergan - we are excited!!

FDA Approves Botox

FDA Approves Botox Cosmetic for temporary improvement of moderate to severe crow's feet

What does this mean? Not a heck of a lot. Doctors have been actively using Botox Cosmetic in this area for years. But because Dysport was previously the only botulinumtoxinA approved for this area, Allergan went ahead with an FDA trial to prove Botox Cosmetic could be used in this area as well. So, congratulations to Allergan on its new FDA approval!

Compound Controversy

Many of my patients use compounded medicines, and I get many compounded medicines for use within my office (numbing cream!). Restricting compounded pharmacies will inhibit many patients from necessary drugs, and even inhibit some treatments I offer, possibly. Please help protect your right to personalized medicine and compounding.

http://www.protectmycompounds.com/social/Click Here To Register

Click on Take Action and choose the appropriate issue for you. Most people will select Concerned Citizens.

Beware of Natural Cosmetics

Dr. F. Victor Rueckl of Lakes Dermatology, Las Vegas Stated Today That Consumers Should Beware That Natural Cosmetics May Not Be Natural at All

A nationally renowned dermatologist, Dr. F. Victor Rueckl of Lakes Dermatology warned consumers today that so called "natural" products may not be any more natural than others on the market. Green packaging, suspect ingredients and other marketing tools are used to lure the customer into believing that the product is superior quality.
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Natural Cosmetics are not necessarily "Natural"

The good news is that consumers can protect themselves by learning to read cosmetic labels and choosing which types of products are right for them," said Dr. F. Victor Rueckl, dermatologist located in Las Vegas, Nevada today.

Las Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) June 19, 2013

Dr. F. Victor Rueckl held a news conference today in Las Vegas at Lakes Dermatology. His concern is that many manufacturers are appearing to be healthy or green and he expressed deep concern that consumers are being conned.

"With all of the false information on cosmetics labels it can be very difficult to determine which products are safe, which brands are handing the consumer a line and which ones will deliver results. The latest buzz in cosmetic advertising and marketing is to appear “all natural” or healthy without actually being any of those things. The packaging is green, the slogans are too and it’s nearly impossible to knows what’s healthy or not," stated Rueckl before his audience.

"The FDA (Federal Drug Administration) oversees cosmetics safety. In reality, cosmetics in our country are extremely under-regulated. For example, out of the over 10,000 cosmetic ingredients available for use, only about 10% have been actually tested for safety. The average person uses around 13 different cosmetic/personal care products daily. That number represents that only 2 of the products one uses regularly has actually passed safety testing. Loose or nonexistent rules on ingredient usage and labeling rules make safety in cosmetics a bit of a toss up," he went on to say.

"It's actually quite simple:Truly Natural Cosmetics Will Show ALL the Ingredients," Rueckl continued.
"The good news is that consumers can protect themselves by learning to read cosmetic labels and choosing which types of products are right for them," said Dr. Rueckl. "Ingredient listings can be confusing, and even misleading, but that is a red flag in itself. If a brand does not disclose a full ingredient listing for each of their products, the concerned consumer should be skeptical of the product's safety. A manufacturer creating safe, nontoxic products should be proud to display exactly what is in each product, in easy to read type", Rueckl stated.

"'Fragrance' or 'parfum' is actually an umbrella term for the dozens of ingredients that beauty manufacturers use to make a product's scent. Don't be fooled if the product is labeled "unscented"; “manufacturers use fragrance to mask any undesirable natural scents”, says Anne Steinemann, Ph.D., an environmental scientist and professor of public affairs at the University of Washington, who studies fragrance in consumer goods.

"Since these formulations are considered "trade secrets" under FDA cosmetic-labeling regulations, companies aren't required to list them all on the label. Dr. Steinemann's research suggests that as many as 30 percent of consumers are allergic or sensitive to fragrance ingredients; to avoid them, look for products labeled "100 percent fragrance-free" and double-check that you don't see the words fragrance or parfum anywhere on the list of ingredients," continued Dr. Steinemann.

Dr. Rueckl then said, "Most companies who use natural scent ingredients will say so on the product label or on their website. If that info is not readily available, give it the “sniff” test. Smell too strong to be natural? It’s probably synthetic."

According to Dr. Rueckl there are many ingredients to avoid.
"It would be nice if consumers had an easy to read and universally agreed upon list of cosmetic ingredients to avoid. The problem is that these ingredients go by several names and many manufacturers are efficient at hiding them in their ingredient listings, making them hard to read or just plain confusing," Rueckl continued.

"The United States has banned only 11 ingredients for use in cosmetics since the FDA began regulating personal-care products in 1938. The European Union, by contrast, has banned or restricted the use of some 1,100 ingredients known or suspected to cause cancer, genetic mutation, reproductive harm or birth defects. Many global beauty manufacturers formulate products without those ingredients for the European market, but sell products containing those same ingredients in the U.S. For more information about which ingredients may pose the most risks, visit the "Chemicals of Concern" page at the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics' Web site," Rueckl further continued.

Dr. Rueckl then explained, "The first ingredients listed on a product label are what the cosmetic contains the most quantity of or the base of the product. Check to see if the product is petroleum or mineral based, or if it is made of synthetic cleansers (usually sodium lauryl sulphate or something with “eth” in the name). Toward the end of the list will be any synthetic preservatives."

“I have seen many products who actually have a pretty clean ingredient list only to find preservatives as the last few listings. Preservatives are very important to certain products. Without them water-based products could grow bacteria, which is definitely not healthy. But there are safe preservatives out there,” said Dr. Rueckl.

"Natural beauty products don't necessarily perform better than standard cosmetic products, but they do tend to use sustainable ingredients and are therefore more beneficial to the environment than synthetic products," Rueckl said.

"Remember, though, that there's no hard-and-fast rule about what a "natural" brand has to do, so a concerned consumer will have to do some homework. Some good signs: that a company uses recyclable or biodegradable packaging made from re-purposed or recycled materials; that its manufacturing facilities are wind- or solar powered; or that its ingredients are mostly biodegradable and won't pollute waterways when you wash them off in the shower," Dr. Rueckl explained.

"If one cares about the environment and wants to reduce their own carbon footprint, these are all good reasons to choose natural, eco-friendly brands over their conventional counterparts. Natural brands that are committed to producing safer cosmetics have worked hard to find better alternatives to the many potentially toxic synthetic ingredients (such as formaldehyde, phthalates and parabens) found in many standard beauty-product formulations. But make sure that the natural brand of choice has figured out a way to protect the purity of its ingredients and give them a longer shelf life without synthetic preservatives, or those chosen favorite products could be breeding grounds for bacteria," Rueckl further explained.

"When formulators have to remove standard preservatives and use only naturally based ingredients to create all natural products, they increase the chance that the cosmetic will be contaminated and could cause disease," Rueckl warns. "Remember that disease-causing microbes are natural too." Some natural brands solve this problem by using inert minerals (which don't offer a hospitable environment for bacteria); others' products may simply have a shorter shelf life or even require refrigeration — akin to the way that you can't keep whole, fresh foods around as long as preservative-laden packaged goods."

Essential oils are a whole other subject and here's a link to a website that regularly updates dangerous oils to avoid or use with caution:
http://eethomp.com/AT/dangerous_oils.html

For more information about natural cosmetics, contact Lakes Dermatology at 702-869-6667. Be sure to download the list of dangerous ingredients to avoid.

Medical Spas | Buyer Beware

Buyers beware. Please watch this video. It's imperative that a doctor is actively involved in his/her practice of "medical spas".

Natural Cosmetics | Essential Oils | Beware

With all of the false information on cosmetics labels it can be very difficult to determine which products are safe, which brands are handing the consumer a line and which ones will deliver results.  The latest buzz in cosmetic advertising and marketing is to appear “all natural” or healthy without actually being any of those things. The packaging is green, the slogans are too and it’s nearly impossible to knows what’s healthy or not.

The FDA oversees cosmetics safety. In reality, cosmetics in our country are extremely under-regulated.  For example, out of the over 10,000 cosmetic ingredients available for use, only about 10% have been actually tested for safety.  The average person uses around 13 different cosmetic/personal care products daily. That number represents that only 2 of the products one uses regularly has actually passed safety testing. Loose or nonexistent rules on ingredient usage and labeling rules make safety in cosmetics a bit of a toss up.  

Truly Natural Cosmetics Will Show ALL the Ingredients
"The good news is that consumers can protect themselves by learning to read cosmetic labels and choosing which types of products are right for them," said Dr. F. Victor Rueckl, dermatologist located in Las Vegas, Nevada today. Ingredient listings can be confusing, and even misleading, but that is a red flag in itself. If a brand does not disclose a full ingredient listing for each of their products, the concerned consumer should be skeptical of the product's safety.  A manufacturer creating safe, nontoxic products should be proud to display exactly what is in each product, in easy to read type.

“Fragrance" or “parfum” is actually an umbrella term for the dozens of ingredients that beauty manufacturers use to make a product's scent. (Don't be fooled if the product is labeled "unscented"; “manufacturers use fragrance to mask any undesirable natural scents”, says Anne Steinemann, Ph.D., an environmental scientist and professor of public affairs at the University of Washington, who studies fragrance in consumer goods.)

Since these formulations are considered "trade secrets" under FDA cosmetic-labeling regulations, companies aren't required to list them all on the label.  Dr. Steinemann's research suggests that as many as 30 percent of consumers are allergic or sensitive to fragrance ingredients; to avoid them, look for products labeled "100 percent fragrance-free" and double-check that you don't see the words fragrance or parfum anywhere on the list of ingredients.

Most companies who use natural scent ingredients will say so on the product label or on their website.  If that info is not readily available, give it the “sniff” test.  Smell too strong to be natural?  It’s probably synthetic.

Ingredients to Avoid
It would be nice if consumers had an easy to read and universally agreed upon list of cosmetic ingredients to avoid. The problem is that these ingredients go by several names and many manufacturers are efficient at hiding them in their ingredient listings, making them hard to read or just plain confusing.

The United States has banned only 11 ingredients for use in cosmetics since the FDA began regulating personal-care products in 1938. The European Union, by contrast, has banned or restricted the use of some 1,100 ingredients known or suspected to cause cancer, genetic mutation, reproductive harm or birth defects. Many global beauty manufacturers formulate products without those ingredients for the European market, but sell products containing those same ingredients in the U.S. For more information about which ingredients may pose the most risks, visit the "Chemicals of Concern" page at the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics' Web site.

The first ingredients listed on a product label are what the cosmetic contains the most quantity of or the base of the product.  Check to see if the product is petroleum or mineral based, or if it is made of synthetic cleansers (usually sodium lauryl sulphate or something with “eth” in the name).  Toward the end of the list will be any synthetic preservatives.  

“I have seen many products who actually have a pretty clean ingredient list only to find preservatives as the last few listings.  Preservatives are very important to certain products.  Without them water-based products could grow bacteria, which is definitely not healthy.  But there are safe preservatives out there,” said Dr.Rueckl.

Here is a list of ingredients to avoid:

DEA, TEA
Purpose/Usage:  foaming agent
Avoid because:  skin sensitizer, can form carcinogenic compounds when mixed with certain cosmetic ingredients
Products found in:  makeup, body wash, shampoo, skincare
How to identify on a label:  DEA, Diethanolamine, TEA, Triethanolamine

Phthalates
Purpose/Usage:  often used as a carrier for synthetic fragrance
Avoid because:  can negatively affect fertility and fetal development, considered a probable carcinogen by the World Health Organizaiton
Products found in:  hair spray, lipstick, perfume and nail polish
How to identify on a label:  Benzylbutyl phthalate (BzBP), Di-n-butyl phthalate or Dibutyl phthalate (DBP), Diethyl phthalate (DEP), and sometimes Fragrance

Formaldehyde
Purpose/Usage:  an impurity released by some chemical preservatives
Avoid because:  carcinogenic, skin and lung irritant, gastrointestinal or liver toxicant and neurotoxin
Products found in:  nail polish, deodorant, shampoo
How to identify on a label:  Formaldehyde, Formalin, Urea, Diazolidinyl urea, Imidazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, Quaternium-15, 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, and Sodium hydroxylmethylglycinate

Parabens
Purpose/Usage:  synthetic preservative
Avoid because:  found in breast tissue, acts like estrogen in the body, could lead to impaired fertility or fetal development
Products found in:  soap, skincare, body care, hair care, toothpaste, deodorant
How to identify on a label: alkyl parahydroxybenzoate, butylparaben, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, isobutylparabens

Petrolatum
Purpose/Usage:  used as an emollient or lubricant
Avoid because:  commonly contains impurities linked to cancer
Products found in:  skincare, body care, lip balm, makeup
How to identify on a label:  petrolatum, petroleum jelly, mineral oil

Propylene Glycol
Purpose/Usage:  helps a product to retain moisture
Avoid because: penetration enhancer (alters skin structure, allowing other chemicals to more easily enter the system)
Products found in:  skincare, hair care, body care, makeup, baby care products, contact lens cleaner
How to identify on a label: Propylene Glycol, Proptylene Glycol, 1,2-Propanediol. Related synthetics: PEG (polyethylene glycol) and PPG (polypropylene glycol)

Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate
Purpose/Usage:  makes a product foamy
Avoid because:   penetration enhancer (alters skin structure, allowing other chemicals to more easily enter the system)
Products found in:  shampoo, facial cleansers, body wash, bubble bath, baby bath, toothpaste
How to identify on a label: Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulfate, Anhydrous Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Irium

1,4 Dioxane
Purpose/Usage:  a chemical by-product of ethoxylation, an ingredient processing method used to make petro-ingredients less irritating to skin
Avoid because:   carcinogenic, suspected cardiovascular and blood toxicant, gastrointestinal toxicant, immunotoxicant, kidney toxicant, neurotoxicant, respiratory toxicant, skin toxicant
Products found in:  shampoo, facial cleansers, body wash, bubble bath, baby bath, liquid soap
How to identify on a label:  because 1,4 Dioxane is a contaminant produced during the manufacturing process, FDA does not require it to be listed on a product ingredient listing.  EWG.org recommends looking for common ingredients which may contain the impurity, identifiable by the prefix or designations of 'PEG,' '–eth–,' 'Polyethylene,'

'Polyethylene glycol' 'Polyoxyethylene,' or '–oxynol–' (FDA 2007).
Synthetic Colorants (FD&C colors)
Purpose/Usage:  coal tar (petroleum) derived and commonly tested on animals due to their carcinogenic properties, used to artificially color a cosmetic product
Avoid because:   can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions
Products found in:  shampoo, facial cleansers, body wash, skincare, baby care products, hair care, makeup
How to identify on a label:  FD&C or D&C followed by a name and number (FD&C RED NO. 40)

Synthetic Fragrances
Purpose/Usage:  combination of chemical ingredients used to artificially scent a cosmetic product
Avoid because: can cause allergic reactions, headache, dizziness, and rash (children tend to be particularly sensitive), respiratory distress, and possible effects to reproductive system
Products found in: hair care, skin care, makeup, body care, perfume
How to identify on a label:  fragrance, parfum (It is important to note that the terms “fragrance” or “parfum” sometimes occur on an ingredient listing which contains natural fragrance ingredients and no chemical ingredients. This is most often due to manufacturer trade secret and should be disclosed on the label.)

Synthetic Sunscreens
Purpose/Usage:  provide sun protection
Avoid because:   have been found to mimic estrogen in the body potentially causing hormonal disruption, can also cause skin irritation and easily absorb in to the skin
Products found in:  sunscreens, facial moisturizer, lip protection
How to identify on a label:  4-Methyl-Benzylidencamphor (4-MBC), Oxybenzone Benzophenone-3, Octyl-methoyl-cinnamates (OMC), Octyl-Dimethyl-Para-Amino-Benzoic Acid (OD-PABA), Homosalate(HMS)
Methylisothiazolinone (MIT)
Purpose/Usage:  widely used as a preservative
Avoid because:   possible neurotoxin, possible health risks to unborn babies, allergic reactions
Products found in:  hair care, body wash, sunscreen, skin care
How to identify on a label:  > 3 (2h) -Isothiazolone, 2-Methyl-; Methylchloroisothiazolinone225methylisothiazolinone Solution; 2-Methyl-3 (2h) -Isothiazolone; 2-Methyl-4-Isothiazolin-3-One; 2-Methyl- 3 (2h) -Isothiazolone; 2-Methyl-2h-Isothiazol-3-One; 3 (2h) Isothiazolone, 2methyl; 2-Methyl-3 (2h) -Isothiazolone; 2-Methyl-4-Isothiazolin-3-One

Lead
Purpose/Usage:  a contaminant of chemical color additives
Avoid because:   a known neurotoxin, linked to brain damage, miscarriage, lowered IQ, increased aggression, and learning disabilities
Products found in:  many conventionally produced lipsticks contain lead, as do some nail polish, hair color, and whitening toothpastes
How to identify on a label:  C.I. 77575; Glover; Ks-4; Lead (Acgih) ; Lead Flake; Lead Inorganic; Lead S2; Olow (Polish) ; Omaha & Grant (as taken from ewg.org), also look for chemical color additives (synthetic colorants above)

"Natural beauty products don't necessarily perform better than standard cosmetic products, but they do tend to use sustainable ingredients and are therefore more beneficial to the environment than synthetic products," Rueckl says.

Remember, though, that there's no hard-and-fast rule about what a "natural" brand has to do, so a concerned consumer will have to do some homework. Some good signs: that a company uses recyclable or biodegradable packaging made from re-purposed or recycled materials; that its manufacturing facilities are wind- or solar-powered; or that its ingredients are mostly biodegradable and won't pollute waterways when you wash them off in the shower.

If one cares about the environment and wants to reduce their own carbon footprint, these are all good reasons to choose natural, eco-friendly brands over their conventional counterparts.

Natural brands that are committed to producing safer cosmetics have worked hard to find better alternatives to the many potentially toxic synthetic ingredients (such as formaldehyde, phthalates and parabens) found in many standard beauty-product formulations. But make sure that the natural brand of choice has figured out a way to protect the purity of its ingredients and give them a longer shelf life without synthetic preservatives, or those chosen favorite products could be breeding grounds for bacteria.

"When formulators have to remove standard preservatives and use only naturally based ingredients to create all-natural products, they increase the chance that the cosmetic will be contaminated and could cause disease," Rueckl warns. "Remember that disease-causing microbes are natural too." Some natural brands solve this problem by using inert minerals (which don't offer a hospitable environment for bacteria); others' products may simply have a shorter shelf life or even require refrigeration — akin to the way that you can't keep whole, fresh foods around as long as preservative-laden packaged goods.

Essential oils are a whole other subject and here's a link to a website that regularly updates dangerous oils to avoid or use with caution:
http://eethomp.com/AT/dangerous_oils.html

For more information about natural cosmetics, contact Lakes Dermatology at 702-869-6667 or http://www.lakesdermatology.com/naturalcosmetics.html

Accutane and IBD - Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Taking Accutane is always a hotly contested topic, but as I've stated again, and again, and again, I think that when prescribed by appropriately trained physicians, and when patients comply with the regimen, it is a safe medication and the only cure for acne. According to Dermatology Times, the news from prior years that Accutane (isotretinoin) was linked to IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) was also incorrect and grossly overstated. In a release today, they state that in a research project done by the University of British Columbia, "Isotretinoin does not appear to be linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease." In the study, the researchers analyzed health records of a population of U.S. women, of whom 2,159 had IBD and 43,180 did not. Only 10 women with IBD had ever used isotretinoin (0.46 percent). These findings were also published in JAMA Dermatology in February. This research supports and clarifies once again that Accutane and IBD do not have a link.

Xeomin cleared to re-enter U.S. market

A while back we blogged about the arrival of Xeomin (incobotulinumtoxinA), the newest neurotoxin, and competitor to Botox and Dysport, which received its FDA approval in 2011 to treat the glabella region. Last year, an injunction was filed by Allergan (the makers of Botox) claiming trade secrets had been stolen from them during this process. The injunction has finally been lifted and Xeomin will hit the market again soon and Merz (the manufacturer) will begin promoting it nationally. Dr. Rueckl and Lakes Dermatology will continue to do our research to make certain this product is as good as other neurotoxins on the market and make decisions about whether we will offer this service, as more information becomes available.

Is Botox a possible treatment for depression?

Dr. Eric Finzi and his team from Chevy Chase Cosmetic Center in Maryland report that Botox may work as a treatment for depression because it physically prevents a person from frowning, which can trigger negative emotions and depressions. Their research involved 84 subjects with severe depression that did not respond well to antidepressants. These patients were split into two groups and half were injected with Botox, while the other half were injected with a placebo. In follow-up visits, 27% of the group that received the Botox stated they had an absence of depression, compared with only 7% of the placebo group. This still needs to be studied more to determine if Botox triggers a biological affect, such as a change in the immune system (which is affected by depression) or whether the change is more psychological, but still the research is interesting!

Do UV nail lamps cause skin cancer?

I get asked about this a lot, as gel manicures become more and more popular due to the lasting effect of the nail polishes. The truth is, we just don't have enough research yet for a conclusive answer. Dr. Joel Schlessinger, a leader in the dermatology community, recently stated in the November issue of Dermatology Times that, "The use of ultraviolet (UV) rays to dry nail polish can spell potential danger for patrons of nail salons. We are seeing more skin cancers on the nails of women who have been close to the UV light." With an opposing view, however, today in Dermatology Times online version, an article was published about research done by Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Providence, R.I. This research notes that while carcinogenic dangers of UV tanning beds have been well documented, skin cancer risks from other artificial lights aren't definitive. Researchers conducted radiation tests from 10-minute sessions of UV light from three devices commonly used in nail salons and found these lights produce a "tiny fraction of a single NBUVB course, and hence does not produce a clinically significant increased risk of developing skin cancer." So, there's not a conclusive answer yet and more research will be needed. Your best bet if gel manicures are your thing? Apply a bit of cool water and some sunscreen about 15 minutes before you go to your nail appointment.

Could Alcohol Affect Your Skin?

We all have heard that a glass of wine a day may be beneficial to your health, and we all know that excess drinking is never good, but did you know that research shows that alcohol may actually affect your skin too? A study conducted at the University of Berlin shows that drinking straight alcohol with no mixers significantly reduces the level of protective antioxidants in the skin, leading to faster sun burning. Consuming antioxidant-rich foods, like fruits, or drinking alcohol with a mixer like orange juice, does help mitigate this effect somewhat. More research is obviously needed on this topic, but the news is interesting, right??

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